In recent years, there has been increasing recognition of the crucial role of community engagement in the successful delivery of public health interventions in humanitarian settings, including for vaccine delivery. However, that evidence is fragmentary and has rarely been used as the systematic basis for planning public health interventions. The goal of Pulse is to establish an evidence base and practice network to support community-led vaccine deployment strategies in humanitarian contexts. The project will encompass three phases:

  1. Convening researchers and practitioners to define current best practice;
  2. Developing an evaluation framework through partnerships with National Red Cross Societies in both Ethiopia and Nigeria to assess how co-creation and community engagement affects vaccination uptake, the management of vaccination programmes and uptake and operationalisation of community insights by implementing organisations; and
  3. Producing guidance and establishing a durable community of practice for innovation in humanitarian vaccination.

Pulse brings together a consortium of researchers, led by the Geneva Centre of Humanitarian Studies in collaboration with London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Addis Ababa University School of Public Health (Ethiopia), and Childcare and Wellness Clinics (Nigeria). The project is implemented in collaboration with International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and the National Societies of Ethiopia and Nigeria.

The programme currently receives funding from the United Kingdom Humanitarian Innovation Hub (UKHIH).

Since its inception in 2020, UKHIH has adopted an approach of brokering and facilitating high-impact collaborations that contribute to major advances in humanitarian innovation through a shared strategic learning process.

The Accelerated Innovation Collaborations (AICs), such as Pulse, are constructed around collaboration, evidence gathering, assessing concepts, and have adoption / scale partners built into each coloration.

A central component of the AICs has been the inclusion of lower-middle income country (LMICs) researchers through the UKHIH fellowship scheme.

Find out more about UKHIH

Dr Yashua Alkali Hamza (MD, Ph.D.)

Dr Yashua Alkali Hamza (MD, Ph.D.)

Chief Executive Officer

Head of Research,

Childcare and Wellness Clinics

Prof. Karl Blanchet

Prof. Karl Blanchet

Professor,

Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva

Director of the Centre

Rose Burns

Rose Burns

Research Fellow,

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Luisa Enria

Luisa Enria

Associate Professor in Anthropology,

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Abiy Seifu Estifanos

Abiy Seifu Estifanos

Assistant Professor in Public Health,

Addis Ababa University

Sabrina Gehrlein

Sabrina Gehrlein

Community Engagement & Accountability Delegate,

International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent

Alex Odlum

Alex Odlum

Researcher

MA of Public Policy

PhD Candidate in Organisational Behaviour, UNIL

Dr Jonathan Polonsky

Dr Jonathan Polonsky

PhD in Global Health

Senior Researcher